Mycorrhizae-Compatible Plants

Approximately 95% of the world's plant species form mycorrhiza and require the association for maximum performance in the field.

Endomycorrhizae

Endomycorrhizae—also referred to as Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhizae (VAM)—symbiotically associate with about 90% of the plant kingdom. Their origins date back 350–460 million years and were important in the colonization of land by vascular plants. Endomycorrhizae form an intercellular attachment by penetrating the cell wall of plant roots and forming branched structures called arbuscules within the root cells. These arbuscules provide an extensive surface area for the exchange of nutrients through the cell membrane. Mycelia from endomycorrhizae extend from the plant roots into the surrounding soil, gathering nutrients and water bringing them back to the plant's roots.

Commonly Utilized Plant Species That Benefit From Endomycorrhizae*

Acacia
Agapanthus
Alder
Almond
Apple
Apricot
Aspen
Araucaria
Artichoke
Ash
Asparagus
Avocado
Bamboo
Banana
Barley
Basil
Bayberry
Bean
Beech
Begonia
Black Locust
Blackberry
BlueGrama
BoxElder
Boxwood
Brazilian Rubber
Bulbs,all
Burning Bush
Cacao
Cactus
Camellia
Carissa
Carrot
Cassava
Ceanothus
Cedar
Celery
Cherry
Chinese Tallow
Chrysanthemum
Citrus, all
Clover
Coconut
Coffee
CoralTree
Corn
Cotton
Cottonwood
Cowpea
Crab Tree
Creosote Bush
Cucumber
Currant
Cypress
Dogwood
Eggplant
Eucalyptus
Euonymus
Fern
Fescues
Fig
Flowers, almost all
Forsythia
Fuschia
Gardenia
Garlic
Geranium
Grapes,all
Grasses, almost all
Green Ash
Guayule
Gum
Hemp
Herbs, all
Hibiscus
Holly
Hops
Hostas
Impatiens
Jojoba
Juniper
Kiwi
Leek
Lettuce
Ligustrum
Lily
Magnolia
Mahonia
Mango
Maples, all
Marigold
Mellon, all
Mesquite
Millet
Mimosa
Morning Glory
Mountain Laurel
Nasturtium
Okra
Olive
Olive Palm
Onion
Palms, all
Papaya
Passion Fruit
Paw Paw
Peach
Peanut
Pecan
Peppers, all
Pistachio
Pittosporum
Plum
Podocarpus
Poplar
Poinsettia
Potato
Pumpkin
Raspberry
Redwood
Rhaphiolepis
Rice
Rose
Russian Olive
Ryegrass
Sagebrush
Saltbush
Sequoia
Snapdragon
Sourwood
Soybean
Squash
Strawberry
Succulents
Sugar Cane
Sumac
Sunflower
Sweet Gum
Sweet Potato
Sycamore
Tea
Tobacco
Tomato
Walnut
Wheat
Willow
Yam
Yew, all

*This list is by no means complete.

Ectomycorrhizae

Ectomycorrhizae symbiotically associate with about 5% of the plant Kingdom, mostly conifers and a few deciduous hardwood trees. They form an extracellular attachment by creating a fungal sheath around the root tips of the tree. The fungus excretes organic chemicals that cause the root cells to become more permeable allowing for greater exchange of gas, water and nutrients. The mycelium of the fungi forages into the soil great distances and transports the nutrients and water back to the root tips of the tree.

Commonly Utilized Plant Species That Benefit From Ectomycorrhizae*

Alder
Arctostaphylos
Aspen
Basswood
Beech
Birch
Chestnut
Chinquapin
Cottonwood
Douglas fir
Eucalyptus
Filbert
Fir
Hazelnut
Hickory
Hemlock
Larch
Linden
Madrone
Manzanita
Oak
Pecan
Pine
Poplar
Spruce
Willow

*This list is by no means complete.

Plant Groups That Benefit From Both Endo- and Ectomycorrhizae

Alder
Aspen
Cottonwood
Eucalyptus
Poplar
Willow

Plant Groups That Do Not Benefit From Endo- or Ectomycorrhizae

Brassica Family
Broccoli
Brussels
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Collards
Kale
Rutabaga
Ericaceae Family
Azalea
Blueberry
Cranberry
Heath
Huckleberry
Lingonberries
Rhododendron
Others
Beet
Carnation
Mustard
Orchids
Protea
Rush
Sedge
Spinach

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